Scully Company Wins 3rd Place in the Fit Company Challenge!

Scully Company Wins 3rd Place in the Fit Company Challenge!

Scully Company participated in the Fit Company Challenge in Philadelphia! As a team, we took on a variety of competitive strength and endurance exercises, ultimately aiming to Work Fit and Live Fit.

As a result of our dedication and training, we were thrilled to win 3rd place overall in our division as well as first place in two of the three challenges! We are already looking forward to participating in the next Fit Company Challenge scheduled for 2017.

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The Fit Company Challenge was an effective and easy way for us to get our office fit and feeling good! Open to all fitness levels, this event created the excitement and motivation we needed to get fit while also providing us the opportunity to work together as a team.

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www.ScullyFit.com 

 

10 Fitness Tips for Fall

Check out these 10 fitness tips brought to you by Livestrong.com to help motivate you as we ease into this beautiful Fall weather.

Overview

Autumn is a transitional time of year. The leaves on the trees change, it becomes darker earlier, and the temperatures cool down. It is a favorite time of year for many people. However, these same changes can also lead to stress for individuals who tend to fall off the health and fitness wagon during the transition. There are many enjoyable opportunities to remain fit, or even begin a fitness program in the fall that can work for everyone. Planning for seasonal changes, finding support from group exercise and embracing events and activities that the season has to offer are key factors in staying fit through the transition.

fall-exercise

1. Take Advantage of Autumn Activities

Autumn group events like pumpkin picking, corn mazes, haunted trails, and building leaf piles are active options that can also be fun bonding experiences for family and friends. Organize a weekend trip or local get-together with an autumn theme and plan to be active.

2. Get Involved in Community Events

With the fall season come many holiday-themed local fun runs and events. Look in the newspaper for Halloween runs, turkey trots and reindeer romps. According to a 1991 summary report by ERIC Digest, training for a specific goal such as a race increases adherence to an exercise program. Signing up with friends or family will hold you accountable for completing the training.

3. Head to the Trails

Fall is one of the most beautiful times of year for getting outside. Grab a friend and find some local parks or trails to walk, run or bike and take in the view of changing leaves.

4. Dress for the Weather

When weather gets cooler, it can deter people from going outside to work out. This problem can be mediated by wearing wind-shielding clothing and dressing in layers. Proper attire and accessories (hats, gloves, etc.) that cut down on bulk but still allow for warmth make outdoor fitness more enjoyable as the chill of fall approaches

5. Drink Water

Stay hydrated even when the temperatures cool down. People often feel less thirsty when it is not hot outside, but staying hydrated is just as important in the fall as it is when the sun is blazing. When fall rolls around, remember to stay on top of your fluid intake to help with both exercise recovery and appetite control.

6. Drink Tea

Drink more tea to warm up for the cooler temperatures. Green tea and black tea contain antioxidants that help ward off diseases during flu season so you can remain healthy and active as the season shifts.

7. Avoid Holiday Candy

According to the National Institutes of Health, on average, non-obese adults gain about a pound a year around the holidays. In addition to creating unhealthy habits, accumulation of this weight over time can lead to obesity. Be sure to pack lots of healthy snacks to munch on throughout the day to help deter you from grazing on sweets that pop up in the office, at home or at holiday parties.

8. Turn Fall Chores into a Workout

According to Health Status, a 150-lb. person can burn 135 calories by raking leaves for 30 minutes. Turn outdoor chores into a game by setting small, achievable goals to help pass time and burn away fat.

9. Exercise Early in the Day

Try to work out in the morning or during the day. With the time changing and the sun setting earlier, it can feel as though it’s later in the day than it really is. This can make people more tired than usual. Getting into a routine of working out early will guarantee the workout gets done and still allow time in the afternoons and evenings to relax.

10. Vary Activities

As the weather cools down and summer ends, it can become difficult to stay motivated. Trying a variety of different activities and varying workouts will help keep a fresh spin on exercise and allow for confidence to build within a wide range of activities.

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Should You Exercise When You Are Sick??

exercise when sick

Getting into a good, steady exercise routine feels great and it’s so frustrating when life gets in the way – especially when it’s in the form of an unwanted cold or flu. When you get sick after you’ve come so far to get into a regular schedule, it’s natural to wonder – “Is it still ok for me to get my cardio in today?” “Will exercising make me feel worse? Or will it help me kick this cold”.  We’ve wondered the same things, so we asked our experts and did our research to get you the answers you’ve been looking for.

In short – the consensus is to use your judgement, evaluate your level of illness and decide accordingly.

If your sickness is simply a common cold, it should be okay to work out, as long as you listen to your body. In regards to whether or not to work out when you’re sick, fitness trainer Anthony Moscardelli explains “It’s not so cut and dry. It’s almost like saying, should you stop exercising if you are injured? The old school of thought is to work around your injuries. The same thing holds true for being sick. If you are “deathly ill”, then obviously you shouldn’t exercise. If you simply have a common cold that is entirely different. Most people with a common cold may feel a bit weaker and should curtail their workouts according to how they feel. I would not suggest to just stop working out all together, as some colds or sinus infections could take 3-5 weeks to get rid of entirely.”

With this information in mind, there are a few things to be cautious of.

  1. Physical activity increases your heart rate, which some cold medicines can cause also. This combination can cause you heart to pump very hard, and lead to a shortness of breath. If you start to experience this, slow down or stop.
  2. If your cold comes along with a fever, exercising can stress your body even more – so hold off for a few days.
  3. Decrease your intensity. If you work out too hard when you have a cold, it can cause you to feel worse and can even slow down your recovery – so cut it back a little.

Richard Besser, MD says to use the neck rule”: If your symptoms are above the neck – sneezing, sinus pressure, stuffy nose – then breaking a sweat is generally considered safe. The American College on Exercise recommends holding off completely if you are experiencing flu-like or below-the-neck symptoms like nausea or vomiting.

So – if you’re symptoms are above the neck and you’re feeling up to sweating out some of those germs, here are the best workouts to embrace and the ones you should completely avoid.

Just Do It

  • Walking: If you want to get moving but don’t have a ton of energy, something is better than nothing. Even a 20 minute walk can help you reap the benefits of regular exercise, and as a bonus can help your symptoms. “If your sinuses are plugged up, walking will stimulate you to take deep breaths and can help open up those passages,” says Besser.
  •  Jogging: If it is part of your regular routine. Running is a natural decongestant – just remember to scale back the intensity.
  • Yoga: Research suggests that stress relieving techniques like breathing exercises and yoga may help boost immunity. A Swedish study also found that humming is a good way to open clogged sinus passages
  • Dance: This is a low impact alternative that allows you to break a sweat without putting too much stress on your body.

Don’t Do It

  • Endurance Running: If you’re in the middle of training for an upcoming distance run or marathon – put it on the back burner, even if you are just starting to feel better or are just coming down with a cold. Andrea Hulse, DO, explains “In general, regular exercise stimulates the immune system and helps keep us healthy,” says Hulse. “But too much regular exercise at a high intensity can have the opposite effect,” she adds. Immune function may be compromised for up to 24 hours after prolonged, continuous exercise (1.5 hours or longer)
  • Lifting Weights: Your strength and performance will likely be diminished while you’re battling a cold, says Besser—especially if you’ve missed out on quality sleep—putting you at increased risk for injury while trying to lift heavy equipment. Plus, the muscle strain required to lift weights can cause sinus pressure and headaches to feel even worse, he adds.
  • Team Sports: Plain and simple – nobody else wants what you have!

So the last question out there is – “When is it ok to  resume your regular exercise routine after you’ve recovered?” Raul Seballos, M.D., vice-chair of the department of preventive medicine at the Cleveland Clinic says, “Listen to your body. Colds typically last for a week to 10 days but it may take you two to three weeks to recover from the flu, depending on the severity. Don’t go 100 percent the first three or four days. Start at 75 percent of your normal workout (for both cardio and weights) and increase gradually for the first week or so. If you try to go back too soon you may have a prolonged recovery phase. You may also be more short of breath if you’re recovering from an upper respiratory infection.”

*You should always consult your doctor for a confirmed medical opinion. The content in this article was developed through online research and discussions with local fitness trainers.

www.scullyfit.com

 

Source: Mens Fitness, WebMDHealth

Just Do Something: 30-Day Challenge

Greatist.com and FitBit have partnered to bring you this easily achievable 30-day challenge to get you through the holidays. Our blog and mission focus’ on promoting measurable and attainable health and wellness goals for our residents and readers. Greatist.com says it best: “Some of our all-time favorite advice: Doing something, anything at all, is always better than nothing. It’s not only true, but the bigger takeaway is that sometimes (like during the holiday season) being realistic is far better than an all-or-nothing approach.”

The 30-Day Challenge they have created, in partnership with Fitbit, makes staying active during this busy time of the year possible. No equipment needed, and the time required each day is minimal. To make it even better, they are giving away a Fitbit Charge HR. For more details, check out Greatist.com 

30 day holiday fitness challenge

 

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Vitamin D Can Improve Your Workouts

vitamin d deficiencies

Along with setting the clocks back for Daylight Savings Time comes colder weather, less sunshine, and vitamin D deficiencies for many people. It’s not something we often consider, but is certainly understandable. For those of us who work a typical work week, it’s dark when we wake up, and dark again when we leave the office. If your job keeps you indoors most of the day, there really isn’t much time to be getting the vitamin D that our bodies require from the outdoors.

A lack of vitamin D can cause various health problems and is an important hormone for our bodies. Vitamin D is used in the formation of bones and teeth, and is necessary for the proper absorption of other nutrients. It may also play a role in preventing cancer, cardiovascular disease, Alzheimers, diabetes, depression and weight gain.

Natural sources of vitamin D include:

  • Sunshine
  • Fatty fish – salmon, trout, mackerel, tuna and eel
  • Canned tuna fish
  • Fortified milk
  • Some types of orange juice – ex. Florida Natural and Minute Maid
  • Egg yolks
  • Fortified cereal

Unfortunately it can be difficult to get enough vitamin D through your diet alone.

In addition to the associated health implications, research has shown that maintaining adequate levels of vitamin D reduces the risk of heart disease, but also helps you improve your performance during exercise.

In a recent study, participants were given either 50 micrograms of vitamin D every day for two weeks, or a placebo. The results showed that those who were given the vitamin D each day had lower blood pressure levels, lower levels of cortisol (the stress hormone), and more interestingly were able to cycle, on average, 6.5 km in 20 minutes, compared with just 5 km before the study began two weeks prior. They also showed lower signs of physical exertion even though they had increased their distance.

With this in mind, ensuring you are supplementing your natural vitamin D intake is certainly something to consider.

So, are you convinced and wondering where you can get the best supplements around to up your workouts, and of course your health? Labdoor.com analyzed the 20 best-selling vitamin D supplements in the US for vitamin D3 content, heavy metal contamination and the presence/absence of GMO events.

We have included the top ten from their list below. All of the options analyzed exceeded their claimed vitamin D3 content, and passed their heavy metals and GMO assays.

 

vitamin d

You should be able to find these supplements at your local drug store easily, or you can purchase them right now, on Amazon.

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Healthy Holiday Side Dishes

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Today, Katie Cavuto – Dietitian and Culinary Nutritionist shares some healthy side dishes to make at home this holiday season!

There is something fun about modernizing the holiday table. I am all for traditional holiday foods but I also love adding unique, healthy dishes that compliment the flavors of the season.  Here are a few easy to make side-dishes that are perfect for holiday entertaining be it a party or the main event!

Maple Roasted Delicata Squash 

Trail Mix Rice Salad 

Curried Eggplant 

Farro with Lacinato Kale and White Beans

Curried Quinoa with Butternut Squash

philadelphia dietitian katie cavuto

Katie Cavuto is the official dietitian to the Philadelphia Phillies and the Flyers, as well as a chef, writer and nutrition expert who offers corporate and private nutrition counseling and cooking classes. She’s also a local and regional TV and media personality whose writing and voice has appeared in Parents Magazine, foodnetwork.com, O, the Oprah MagazinePhiladelphia magazine, and Women’s Health (among other publications). Katie also plays the role of mom: Son Hudson is four. For more healthy living inspiration visit her blog Nourish.Breathe.Thrive.

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