The 30-Day Treadmill Workout

The 30-Day Treadmill Workout

Today’s post is brought to you by Shape.com

Against all odds, you might just fall in love with the treadmill this month, thanks to this killer workout program that uses speed, hill, and endurance intervals—plus body-weight moves with the treadmill…

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In addition to helping you beat boredom, the roughly 30-minute-long interval workout will help you become a stronger runner by improving your endurance, speed, and power over the month, while also sculpting your entire body with killer hill intervals and body-weight moves that incorporate the turned-off treadmill. (You can also opt to do them on a mat instead.) Don’t worry, you’ll also have time for recovery—which can mean a jog or a walk if you’re a beginner—to get your heart rate down and prepare you for the next interval. And most importantly, since the program is built around your own personal base pace (more on how to figure out that number below), it’s designed for all levels of athletes—even those brand new to running.

How it works: The first week, you’ll follow the workout as-is. If you’re new to running, start implementing this workout into your routine two days per week, Arzon suggests. The rest of the week you’ll spend doing low-impact workouts like spinning or yoga, plus one “long” run—whatever that means to you. While this is a great opportunity for those training for longer races to get their miles in, it can also be swapped for 60 minutes of sustained cardio, such as 30 minutes on the StairMaster and 30 minutes on elliptical, Arzon says. For the rest of the month, you’ll focus on improving one component of the workout each week—speed, hills, or endurance—while keeping the other areas the same. (This ensures you don’t increase your total distance by more than 10 percent per week, a good safety measure.) Even though you’re only making one component harder at a time, you’ll probably see improvement across the board, she says.

Before you begin your treadmill workout, start with some pre-run dynamic stretches that will improve your range of motion and loosen up your muscles to help reduce your risk for injury. And after you finish your cool-down sesh, turn the treadmill off and use it for some quick static stretches that will help loosen up tight quads, glutes, lats, and hamstrings.

Treadmill Challenge Chart

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